Carnegiea gigantea, Giant Saguaro

Southwest Desert Flora

Home to the plants of the Sonoran, Chihuahuan and Mojave Deserts

Cirsium ochrocentrum, Yellowspine Thistle

Anemone tuberosa, Tuber Anemone

Anemone tuberosa, Tuber AnemoneAnemone tuberosa, Tuber AnemoneAnemone tuberosa, Tuber AnemoneAnemone tuberosa, Tuber AnemoneAnemone tuberosa, Tuber Anemone


Scientific Name: Anemone tuberosa
Common Name: Tuber Anemone
Also Called: Desert Anemone, Desert Windflower
Family: Ranunculaceae, Buttercup or Crowfoot Family
Synonyms: ()
Status: Native
Duration: Perennial
Size: Up to 15 inches or so more or less, usually much less.
Growth Form: Forb/herb; stems 1 - few from a short, tuber-like, sometimes forked root; herbage sparsely soft-pubescence or nearly glabrous.
Leaves: Green; cauline leaves dissected, leaf segments oblong to ovate; basal leaves few; glabrous; margins entire or toothed.
Flower Color: Pink to white; 1 to 3 flowers; sepals are large and showy, linear-oblong; petal-like, petals none or rudimentary; flowers on one peduncle; solitary or terminal in cymes.
Flowering Season: February to April; April to May in California.
Elevation: 2,500 to 5,000 feet.
Habitat Preferences: Rocky hillsides and slopes, ledges, mesas, stream-sides.
Recorded Range: Anemone tuberosa is found in the southwest United States in AZ, CA, NM, NV, TX and UT. All of the states have scattered populations. In Arizona in the northwest, central and southeast part of the state. Tuber Anemone is also native to Baja California and northern Mexico.

North America & US County Distribution Map for Anemone tuberosa.

U.S. Weed Information: No information available.
Invasive/Noxious Weed Information: No information available.
Wetland Indicator: No information available.
Threatened/Endangered Information: No information available.

Genus Information: The genus Anemone is found throughout all of North America. According to the USDA Plants.gov there are 26 species with 50 accepted taxa. World wide, The Plant List includes 172 accepted species.

In Arizona and Nevada there are 3 species in Anemone; California has 6 species; New Mexico has 5 species; Texas and Utah each have 4 species. All species data is approximate and subject to taxonomic changes at any time.

There are 2 varieties in Anemone tuberosa;
Anemone tuberosa var. texana, Tuber Anemone (NM, TX);
Anemone tuberosa var. tuberosa, Tuber Anemone (AZ, CA, NM, NV, TX, UT).

Comments: Tuber Anemone is an attractive plant, often solitary or in small numbers. Some species of Anemone are known as windflowers and are sold commercially.

Date Profile Completed: 06/16/2016
References:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service on-line database and USGS ITIS search - (accessed 06/16/2016)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/ClassificationServlet?source=display&classid=ANEMO
Arizona Flora, Kearney, Thomas H., Peebles, Robert H., 1960, University of California Press, Berkley and Los Angeles, California.
Bryan E. Dutton, Carl S. Keener & Bruce A. Ford, FNA | Family List | FNA Vol. 3 | Ranunculaceae |Anemone | 6. Anemone tuberosa Rydberg, Bull. Torrey Bot. Club. 29: 151. 1902. Flora of North America North of Mexico. 16+ vols. New York and Oxford.
The Plant List (2013). Version 1.1. Published on the Internet; http://www.theplantlist.org/ (accessed 06/16/2016).
http://www.theplantlist.org/1.1/browse/A/Ranunculaceae/Anemone/
Native Plant Information Network, NPIN (2013). Published on the Internet http://www.wildflower.org/plants/ [accessed: 06/16/2016]. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at The University of Texas, Austin, TX.
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ANTU
1993, The Jepson Manual, Citation: http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/interchange/I_treat_indexes.html (accessed 06/16/2016)
http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_JM_treatment.pl?6434,6441,6447
SEINet for synonyms, scientific names, recorded geographic locations and general information
http://swbiodiversity.org/seinet/(accessed 06/16/2016).