Carnegiea gigantea, Giant Saguaro

Southwest Desert Flora

Home to the plants of the Sonoran, Chihuahuan and Mojave Deserts

Cirsium ochrocentrum, Yellowspine Thistle

Allowissadula holosericea, Chisos Mtn False Indianmallow

Chisos Mtn False Indianmallow; many species of the Mallow Family, including Velvet-leaf Mallow are heavily insect pollinated. Here a honey bee (Apis) extracts nectar from the showy flower. Allowissadula holosericea Chisos Mtn False Indianmallow has medium size showy orange-yellow flowers. This species blooms from June to October. Allowissadula holosericea Chisos Mtn False Indianmallow flowers are insect pollinated. Velvet-leaf Mallow is larval host for: Common Checkered Skipper, Texas Powdered Skipper and Common Streaky-Skipper. Allowissadula holosericea Chisos Mtn False Indianmallow is a native species found in New Mexico and Texas. Leaves have a velvety-like texture and are heart-shaped or cordate to ovate in shape. Allowissadula holosericea Chisos Mtn False Indianmallow is a perennial shrub that grows up to 5 feet and is found in elevations ranges from 300 to 4,500 feet. It is one of only two species in the United States from the genus Allowissadula. Allowissadula holosericea


Scientific Name: Allowissadula holosericea
Common Name: Chisos Mtn False Indianmallow
Also Called: Chisos Mtn. False Indian-mallow and Velvet-leaf Mallow
Family: Malvaceae, Globe Mallow Family
Synonyms: (Abutilon marshii, Wissadula holosericea)
Status: Native
Duration: Perennial
Size: Up to 5 feet.
Growth Form: shrub; plants herbage sparsely to densely, velvety-tawny, stellate-hairy; glandular.
Leaves: Green; alternate; velvet-like texture, cordate to ovate; typical Malvaceae stellate pubescence; margins crenate, dentate.
Flower Color: Orange-yellow; flowers campanulate, smooth or ribbed; bisexual; inflorescence terminal usually open cymes or panicles; fruit a mericarp,
Flowering Season: June to October.
Elevation: 300 feet to above 4,500 feet.
Habitat Preferences: Dry rocky soils; open habitats, roadsides, woodlands.
Recorded Range: Allowissadula holosericea is relatively rare in the United States where it is only found in limited populations in Texas and New Mexico. It is also native to northern Mexico.

North America & US County Distribution Map for Allowissadula holosericea.

U.S. Weed Information: No information available.
Invasive/Noxious Weed Information: No information available.
Wetland Indicator: No information available.
Threatened/Endangered Information: No information available.

Genus Information: In North America there are 2 species and 2 accepted taxa overall for Allowissadula. World wide, The Plant List includes 10 accepted species names and a further 34 infraspecific rank for the genus.

In the Southwestern United States: Arizona has 0 species of Allowissadula, California has 0 species, Nevada has 0 species, New Mexico has 1 species, Texas has 2 species, Utah has 0 species. All data is approximate and subject to taxonomic changes.

Comments: Many species of the Mallow Family, including Velvet-leaf Mallow are heavily insect pollinated. Velvet-leaf Mallow is larval host for: Common Checkered Skipper, Texas Powdered Skipper and Common Streaky-Skipper.

Allowissadula holosericea may be used as a landscape species in the southwestern United States.

Date Profile Completed: 02/23/2017
References:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service on-line database and USGS ITIS search - (accessed 02/22/2017)
https://plants.usda.gov/java/ClassificationServlet?source=profile&symbol=ALLOW&display=31
The Plant List (2013). Version 1.1. Published on the Internet; http://www.theplantlist.org/ (accessed 02/22/2017).
http://www.theplantlist.org/1.1/browse/A/Malvaceae/Allowissadula/
David M. Bates, FNA | Family List | FNA | Family List | FNA Vol. 6 | Malvaceae | Allowissadula, 1. Allowissadula holosericea (Scheele) D. M. Bates, Gentes Herbarum. 11: 340. 1978. ; Flora of North America Editorial Committee, eds. 1993+. Flora of North America North of Mexico. 16+ vols. New York and Oxford.
Native Plant Information Network, NPIN (2013). Published on the Internet http://www.wildflower.org/plants/ [accessed: 02/22/2017]. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at The University of Texas, Austin, TX.
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ALHO4
BAMONA; Butterflies and Moths of North America; Collecting and sharing data about Lepidoptera; (accessed 09/21/2016).
http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Pyrgus-communis
http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Systasea-pulverulenta
http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Celotes-nessus
SEINet synonyms, scientific names, geographic locations, general information - (accessed 02/22/2017).
http://swbiodiversity.org/seinet/