Carnegiea gigantea, Giant Saguaro

Southwest Desert Flora

Home to the plants of the Sonoran, Chihuahuan and Mojave Deserts

Cirsium ochrocentrum, Yellowspine Thistle

Ipomoea ternifolia, Tripleleaf Morning-glory

Ipomoea ternifolia, Tripleleaf Morning-glory, Southwest Desert Flora Ipomoea ternifolia, Tripleleaf Morning-glory, Southwest Desert Flora Ipomoea ternifolia, Tripleleaf Morning-glory, Southwest Desert Flora Ipomoea ternifolia, Tripleleaf Morning-glory, Southwest Desert FloraIpomoea ternifolia, Tripleleaf Morning-glory, Southwest Desert Flora

Scientific Name: Ipomoea ternifolia
Common Name: Tripleleaf Morning-glory
Also Called: Ipomoea
Family: Convolvulaceae, Morning Glory Family
Synonyms: ()
Status: Native
Duration: Annual
Size: Low growing, prostrate, trailing and climbing on adjacent plants.
Growth Form: Forb/herb; vine; twining with slender stems, grows on neighboring plants.
Leaves: Green; leaves on short stems or petioles, leaves deeply dissected palmately, 5 to 11 variable but basically linear lobes.
Flower Color: Purple; solitary flowers on slender pedicels, flowers tubular or funnel-form, sepals not equal in size, flowers glabrous, fruit is a globose capsule.
Flowering Season: August to September.
Elevation: 6,000 feet.
Habitat Preferences:
Recorded Range: Tripleleaf Morning-glory is rare in the United States where it only occurs in Arizona and Texas. It is also found in Baja California and northern Mexico.
In Arizona it is found in the central, south and southeast parts of the state.

U.S. Weed Information: No information available.
Invasive/Noxious Weed Information: The genus Ipomoea is listed as a Noxious Weed by Arizona and Arkansas. Exceptions in Arizona are:
Ipomoea carnea, Mexican bush morning glory,
Ipomoea triloba, Three-lobed Morning Glory, and
Ipomoea arborescens, Morning Glory Tree the federal government and/or a State.
Plants included here are invasive or noxious.
Wetland Indicator: No information available.
Threatened/Endangered Information: No information available.

Genus Information: 67 species more or less in Ipomoea throughout most of the United States and eastern Canada. 14 species in Arizona. There is 1 variety in Ipomoea ternifolia;
Ipomoea ternifolia var. leptotoma, Tripleleaf Morning-glory.

Comments: There is not much information in the literature or online for this species.

As with many Morning-glories, Tripleleaf Morning-glory attracts bees, butterflies and birds.

Also see; Canyon Morning-glory, Ipomoea barbatisepala, Purple Morning-glory, Ipomoea capillacea, Crestrib Morning-glory, Ipomoea costellata, Trans-Pecos morning-glory, Ipomoea cristulata, Ivyleaf Morning-glory, Ipomoea hederacea and Pinkthroat Morning-glory, Ipomoea longifolia.

Date Profile Completed: 4/1/2015, rev. 07/22/2015
References:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service on-line database – ITIS search
Arizona Flora, Kearney, Thomas H., Peebles, Robert H., 1960, University of California Press, Berkley and Los Angeles, California.
Austin, Daniel F. 1998. J. Ariz. - Nev. Acad. Sci. Convolvulaceae 30(2): 61.
SEINet for synonyms, scientific names and recorded geographic locations, http://swbiodiversity.org/seinet/.
USDA – Noxious Weed Information: Arizona, Ipomoea, Morning Glory, Prohibited noxious weed, Arkansas, Ipomoea, Morning Glory, Noxious weed
Note: in Arizona all species prohibited except
Ipomoea carnea, Mexican bush morning glory,
Ipomoea triloba, Three-lobed Morning Glory, and
Ipomoea arborescens, Morning Glory Tree.