Carnegiea gigantea, Giant Saguaro

Southwest Desert Flora

Home to the plants of the Sonoran, Chihuahuan and Mojave Deserts

Cirsium ochrocentrum, Yellowspine Thistle

Oncosiphon piluliferum, Globe Chamomile

Oncosiphon piluliferum, Globe Chamomile, Southwest Desert FloraOncosiphon piluliferum, Globe Chamomile, Southwest Desert Flora Oncosiphon piluliferum, Globe Chamomile, Southwest Desert Flora   Oncosiphon piluliferum, Globe Chamomile, Southwest Desert Flora Oncosiphon piluliferum, Globe Chamomile, Southwest Desert Flora   Oncosiphon piluliferum, Globe Chamomile, Southwest Desert Flora

Scientific Name: Oncosiphon piluliferum
Common Name: Globe Chamomile
Also called: Stinknet
Family: Asteraceae, Sunflower Family
Synonyms: (Cotula pilulifera, Matricaria globifera, Pentzia globifera)
Status: Introduced
Duration: Annual
Size: Up to 2 feet or more.
Growth Form: Forb/herb; multiple green stems, glandular, branching, bushy.
Leaves: Green; alternate, leafy, pinnatifid with linear lobes, 3 to 5 lobes, lower leaves longer, upper leaves bract-like.
Flower Color: Yellow or Gold; flower heads solitary or in small clusters; disk flowers only; leafless flowering stalks (inflorescence), fruit is an achene.
Flowering Season: March to June, dependent on rainfall.
Elevation: Sea Level to 2,000 feet.
Habitat Preferences: Lower desert areas in clay, sandy and gravelly soils and washes, often in disturbed areas.
Recorded Range: Central Arizona and moving to the north and south. In California in the Los Angeles area with confirmed records south of San Diego. This species was first recorded as an invasive in California.

U.S. Weed Information: No data available.
Invasive/Noxious Weed Information: No data available.
Wetland Indicator: No data available.
Threatened/Endangered Information: No data available.

Genus Information: 2 species in Oncosiphon in the United States, both introduced. 1 species in Arizona.

Comments: Stinknet or Globe Chamomile is an introduced species found in central Arizona and southeast California. It was brought to Phoenix as a cultured desert habitat specimen. It is a fast moving invasive in Arizona quickly moving through the greater Phoenix area. At this time it is not listed as an invasive or noxious weed by Arizona or the federal government.

Stinknet is so named because it has a strong unpleasant odor.

Date Profile Completed: 06/26/2012, rev. 08/07/2012; Updated, 07/26/20155
References:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service on-line database
David J. Keil, FNA | Family List | FNA Vol. 19, 20 and 21 | Asteraceae | Oncosiphon, Flora of North America Editorial Committee, eds. 1993+. Flora of North America North of Mexico. 16+ vols. New York and Oxford. (accessed 08/07/2012)
SEINet for synonyms, scientific names and recorded geographic locations, http://swbiodiversity.org/seinet/