Carnegiea gigantea, Giant Saguaro

Southwest Desert Flora

Home to the plants of the Sonoran, Chihuahuan and Mojave Deserts

Cirsium ochrocentrum, Yellowspine Thistle

Melampodium leucanthum, Plains Blackfoot Daisy

Melampodium leucanthum, Plains Blackfoot Daisy, Southwest Desert Flora Melampodium leucanthum, Plains Blackfoot Daisy, Southwest Desert Flora Melampodium leucanthum, Plains Blackfoot Daisy, Southwest Desert Flora    Melampodium leucanthum, Plains Blackfoot Daisy, Southwest Desert Flora Melampodium leucanthum, Plains Blackfoot Daisy, Southwest Desert Flora   Melampodium leucanthum, Plains Blackfoot Daisy, Southwest Desert Flora


Scientific Name: Melampodium leucanthum
Common Name: Plains Blackfoot Daisy
Also called: Blackfoot Daisy, Plains Blackfoot, Rock Daisy
Family: Asteraceae, Sunflower Family
Synonyms: ( )
Status: Native
Duration: Perennial
Size: Up to 12 inches.
Growth Form: Subshrub; small rounded, bushy, much wider than it is tall, branching; woody stems at the base (suffrutescent).
Leaves: Green or gray-green; opposite, narrowly linear or lanceolate; covered with fine stiff hairs (strigose).
Flower Color: White and yellow, daisy-like; radiate flowers; ray flowers with 2 notches on tips, 8 to 13 ray flowers; yellow disk flowers numerous; single flower heads on tips of short, 1 to 4 inch stalks (peduncles); fruit is an achene.
Flowering Season: March to November.
Elevation: 2,000 to 5,000 feet.

Habitat Preferences: Lower and upper deserts, dry rocky hillsides, grasslands, slopes and mesas, prefers sandy and gravelly soil, often in limestone or caliche soils.

Recorded Range: Native to the southwestern United States in AZ, CO, KS, NM, OK, TX and northern Mexico. Throughout most of Arizona, few records in Yuma, County.

North America & US County Distribution Map for Melampodium leucanthum.

U.S. Weed Information: No data available.
Invasive/Noxious Weed Information: No data available.
Wetland Indicator: No data available.
Threatened/Endangered Information: No data available.

Genus Information: 7 species in Melampodium, southwestern United States and Florida. 3 species native to Arizona.

Comments: Plains Blackfoot Daisy is an excellent landscape species for a natural look in rock landscapes and other arid gardens. Plains Blackfoot Daisy is easily confused with Desert Zinnia, Zinnia acerosa which also has white and yellow daisy-like flowers. The differences are not always clear but one difference is Desert Zinnia has fewer ray flowers 4 to 6, versus 8 to 10 on Plains Blackfoot Daisy.

The common name "Blackfoot" is a reference to the black color at the base of the stem and roots. Also see Shaggy Blackfoot, Melampodium strigosum.

Date Profile Completed: 06/23/2012, rev. 08/06/2012; Updated, 07/26/2015, updated format 10/10/2017
References:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service on-line database
Arizona Flora, Kearney, Thomas H., Peebles, Robert H., 1960, University of California Press, Berkley and Los Angeles
John L. Strother, FNA | Family List | FNA Vol. 21 | Asteraceae | Melampodium, Flora of North America Editorial Committee, eds. 1993+. Flora of North America North of Mexico. 16+ vols. New York and Oxford. (accessed 08/06/2012)
Cynthia B. McKinney et. al., Texas Tech University,
Department of Plant & Soil Science, “Plains ‚ÄúPlains Blackfoot Daisy" (HortScience 39-3:637-638, 2004.)
SEINet for synonyms, scientific names and recorded geographic locations, http://swbiodiversity.org/seinet/