Carnegiea gigantea, Giant Saguaro

Southwest Desert Flora

Home to the plants of the Sonoran, Chihuahuan and Mojave Deserts

Cirsium ochrocentrum, Yellowspine Thistle

Isocoma tenuisecta, Burroweed

Isocoma tenuisecta, Burroweed, Southwest Desert Flora Isocoma tenuisecta, Burroweed, Southwest Desert Flora Isocoma tenuisecta, Burroweed, Southwest Desert Flora    Isocoma tenuisecta, Burroweed, Southwest Desert Flora Isocoma tenuisecta, Burroweed, Southwest Desert Flora    Isocoma tenuisecta, Burroweed, Southwest Desert Flora


Scientific Name: Isocoma tenuisecta
Common Name: Burroweed
Also called: Burrow Goldenweed
Family: Asteraceae, Sunflower Family
Synonyms: (Haplopappus tenuisectus, Aplopappus tenuisectus)
Status: Native
Duration: Perennial
Size: To 3 feet.
Growth Form: Forb/herb, subshrub; compact, multiple woody stems, vertical, small fine hairs.
Leaves: Green or grayish-green; glandular; alternate, deeply or pinnately divided in 4 or more linear lobes; dried older leaves persist at bloom.
Flower Color: Yellow; small, discoid flowers only; dense clusters on terminal tips of long stalks; old flowers turn brown and persist on plant; fruit an achene.
Flowering Season: August to October.
Elevation: 2,000 to 5,500 feet.
Habitat Preferences: Wide variety of habitats, lower and upper Sonoran deserts, sunny open areas, dry desert washes, mesas, roadsides and other disturbed areas.
Recorded Range: In the United States, only in AZ and NM; central and southern Arizona, southeastern and northwest New Mexico. Burroweed is also native to northwest Mexico.

North America & US County Distribution Map for Isocoma tenuisecta.

U.S. Weed Information: No data available.
Invasive/Noxious Weed Information: No data available.
Wetland Indicator: No data available.
Threatened/Endangered Information: No data available.

Genus Information: 11 species in Isocoma, all in southwestern United States. 5 species are native to

Comments: Burroweed is common in Arizona and one of many yellow fall blooming subshrubs in the state originally belonging to the large genus Haplopappus. After more review species were moved to Isocoma, Ericameria and other genera.

Burroweed readily attracts insects and butterflies. It is poisonous to livestock including cattle and sheep and its presence is considered an indicator of overgrazed rangelands. It is similar in appearance to the closely related Alkali Goldenbush, Isocoma acradenia whose leaves are linear and not pinnately divided.

In Southwest Desert Flora, also see Southern Goldenbush, Isocoma pluriflora and Rusby's Goldenbush, Isocoma rusbyi.

Date added: 06/18/2012; Updated, 07/26/2015
References:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service on-line database - Integrated Taxonomic Information System, ITIS, Mon Jun 18 2012 01:49:42 MDT, http://www.itis.gov/
Arizona Flora, Kearney, Thomas H., Peebles, Robert H., 1960, University of California Press, Berkley and Los Angeles, as Aplopappus tenuisectus.
Guy L. Nesom, Flora of North America Editorial Committee, eds. 1993+. Flora of North America North of Mexico. 16+ vols. New York and Oxford.
SEINet for synonyms, scientific names and recorded geographic locations, http://swbiodiversity.org/seinet/