Carnegiea gigantea, Giant Saguaro

Southwest Desert Flora

Home to the plants of the Sonoran, Chihuahuan and Mojave Deserts

Cirsium ochrocentrum, Yellowspine Thistle

Coreopsis tinctoria, Golden Tickseed

Coreopsis tinctoria, Golden Tickseed, Southwest Desert Flora Coreopsis tinctoria, Golden Tickseed, Southwest Desert Flora Coreopsis tinctoria, Golden Tickseed, Southwest Desert Flora     Coreopsis tinctoria, Golden Tickseed, Southwest Desert Flora

Scientific Name: Coreopsis tinctoria
Common Name: Golden Tickseed
Also Called: Calliopsis, Golden Coreopsis, Goldenwave, Plains Coreopsis and Plains Tickseed
Family: Asteraceae, Sunflower Family
Synonyms: (Coreopsis atkinsoniana, Coreopsis cardaminefolia, Coreopsis similis, Coreopsis stenophylla)
Status: Native
Duration: Annual, biennial or perennial.
Size: Up to 2 feet or more.
Growth Form: Forb/herb; erect stem from basal rosette, multiple branching.
Leaves: Green; opposite, mostly linear, smooth, pinnately divided into linear lobes, 3 to 4 inches long.
Flower Color: Bright yellow and brown; numerous small radiate heads on slender stalks about an inch wide, 8 yellow ray flowers with notched ends, disk flowers maroon or reddish-brown; fruit is an achene.
Flowering Season: June to September, follows monsoon rainfall, may bloom throughout the year.
Elevation: 2,000 to 7,000 feet.
Habitat Preferences: Various habitat types, meadows, roadsides, disturbed areas, either sandy or clay soils
Recorded Range: Throughout the United States and Canada and northern Mexico. Northern Arizona.

U.S. Weed Information: Coreopsis tinctoria is listed in Weeds of Nebraska and the Great Plains, and in Weeds of the United States and Canada. Plants included here may become weedy or invasive.
Invasive/Noxious Weed Information: No data available.
Wetland Indicator:Coreopsis tinctoria is listed on the USDA 2012 National Wetland Plant List.
Threatened/Endangered Information: No data available

Genus Information: 33 species in Coreopsis. 7 species listed as Threatened or Endangered. 3 varieties in Coreopsis tinctoria;
Coreopsis tinctoria var. atkinsoniana, occurs in western North America;
Coreopsis tinctoria var. similis, distribution limited to Texas; and
Coreopsis tinctoria var. tinctoria, same localities as recorded range above.

Comments: Golden Tickseed is native to western and eastern United States and it is interesting that it is considered a weed in the mid-west. It is a common cultivated landscape plant throughout the country under the name Calliopsis.

Golden Tickseed has been used by indigenous people as a ceremonial chant lotion and to make tea. See species account from Native American Ethnobotany, University of Michigan, Dearborn.

Date Profile Completed: 7/30/2012; Updated, 07/25/2015
References:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service on-line database; Integrated Taxonomic Information System, ITIS, Mon Jul 30 2012 11:55:43 MDT, http://www.itis.gov/
Arizona Flora, Kearney, Thomas H., Peebles, Robert H., 1960, University of California Press, Berkley and Los Angeles
The Jepson Manual, Citation: http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/interchange/I_treat_indexes.html Mon Jul 30 11:16:52 2012
John L. Strother, FNA | Family List | FNA Vol. 21 | Asteraceae | Coreopsis, Flora of North America Editorial Committee, eds. 1993+. Flora of North America North of Mexico. 16+ vols. New York and Oxford. (accessed 07/30/2012)
SEINet for synonyms, scientific names and recorded geographic locations, http://swbiodiversity.org/seinet/