Carnegiea gigantea, Giant Saguaro

Southwest Desert Flora

Home to the plants of the Sonoran, Chihuahuan and Mojave Deserts

Cirsium ochrocentrum, Yellowspine Thistle

Berlandiera lyrata, Lyreleaf Greeneyes

Berlandiera lyrata, Lyreleaf Greeneyes, Southwest Desert Flora Berlandiera lyrata, Lyreleaf Greeneyes, Southwest Desert Flora    Berlandiera lyrata, Lyreleaf Greeneyes, Southwest Desert Flora Berlandiera lyrata, Lyreleaf Greeneyes, Southwest Desert Flora    Berlandiera lyrata, Lyreleaf Greeneyes, Southwest Desert Flora

Scientific Name: Berlandiera lyrata
Common Name: Lyreleaf Greeneyes
Also Called: Chocolate Daisy, Chocolate Flower, Greeneyes and Lyre-leaf.
Family: Asteraceae, Sunflower Family
Synonyms: ( )
Status: Native
Duration: Annual, taproot.
Size: To 2 feet
Growth Form: Forb/herb; basal rosette, lower stems erect or curving upward (decumbent), upper branches with flower heads, stems hairy, leafy plant, chocolate-like scent.
Leaves: Green, grayish-green above; whitish underneath, leaf shape is variable, oblanceolate or obovate, entire, toothed or crenate, some pinnatifid or lyrate with a large terminal lobe.
Flower Color: Deep yellow to orange; showy, 2 inch daisy-like flowers, yellow ray flowers attached to phyllaries; brown disk flowers, flowers singular or several atop long leafless stalks; fruit a pubescent achene, seed heads brown.
Flowering Season: April to October.
Elevation: 4,000 to 5,000 feet.
Habitat Preferences: Rocky hillsides in sunny or semi-sunny areas, plains, mesas, roadsides and irrigated fields.
Recorded Range: In the southwest United States; AZ, CO, KS, NM, OK and TX and northern Mexico. In Arizona limited distribution the southern and southeast parts of the state.

U.S. Weed Information: No data available.
Invasive/Noxious Weed Information: No data available.
Wetland Indicator: No data available.
Threatened/Endangered Information: No data available.

Genus Information: 5 species in Berlandiera native to mostly the southern United States. 1 species in Arizona.

Comments: Lyreleaf Greeneyes is so named because the leaves are so margins are so variable. They may be oblanceolate or obovate or pinnately divided or lyrate and its leaves may be entire or with small rounded projections or crenulate. This species readily attracts insects including butterflies and birds as well. It is recommended as a southwest desert landscape plant because of its bright color and its chocolate scent.

The flower heads of Lyreleaf Greeneyes have been used as a seasoning for food and the dried roots were burned, ground and tossed on hot coals and the smoke inhaled for nervousness by Native Americans. See full species account from from Native American Ethnobotany, University of Michigan, Dearborn.
Date Profile Completed: 8/9/2012; Updated, 07/25/2015
References:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service on-line database
Arizona Flora, Kearney, Thomas H., Peebles, Robert H., 1960, University of California Press, Berkley and Los Angeles
Donald J. Pinkava, FNA | Family List | FNA Vol. 21 | Asteraceae | Berlandiera, Flora of North America Editorial Committee, eds. 1993+. Flora of North America North of Mexico. 16+ vols. New York and Oxford. Accessed 08/09/2012
SEINet for synonyms, scientific names and recorded geographic locations, http://swbiodiversity.org/seinet/